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19. Bionik-Seminar - Online

Herzliche Einladung zum Bionik-Seminar im Sommersemester 2021, das zum zweiten Mal online stattfindet. Diese interdisziplinäre Veranstaltung behandelt Themen aus BiologieBionik und Ingenieurwissenschaften. Es richtet sich an Wissenschaffende, Studierende und die interessierte Öffentlichkeit.

 

04.05.2021 – 17.00 Uhr

Dr. Julian K.A. Langowski, Wageningen University, The Netherlands

Kermit’s sticky little fingers: Learning from tree frogs for soft robotic grip

 

18.05.2021 – 17.00 Uhr

Dr. Francesco Picella, Laboratoire d’Hydrodynamique, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, France

Controlling laminar-to-turbulent transition with superhydrophobic surfaces

 

08.06.2021 - 17.00 Uhr

Dr. Thomas Engels, Institute of Biosciences, Rostock University

There is a Fly in my Supercomputer: What Numerical Simulations Teach us About the Flight of Houseflies.

 

15.06.2021 - 17.00 Uhr

Prof. Dr. Antoine Le Duigou, Dupuy de Lôme Research Institute, France

Biomimicry and 4D printing for 4.0 biocomposites

Zusammenfassungen zu den Vorträgen sind nachstehend aufgeführt. Die Übertragung der Vorträge findet über das Video-Konferenz-System ZOOM statt. Für die Teilnahme bestehen zwei Möglichkeiten: (1) Internet-Browser (z.B. Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Microsoft Edge …) oder (2) zu installierender, kostenfreier Client.

 

Link zur Video-Konferenz: https://hs-bremen.zoom.us/j/98960999390
Meeting-ID: 989 6099 9390
Kenncode: Bionik

 

Bitte beachten Sie die Datenschutzhinweise zum Einsatz von ZOOM. 

 

Einlass ist immer ca. 15 Minuten vor Beginn.

 

Wir freuen uns auf Ihre Teilnahme!

 

Albert Baars

 

 

04.05.2021 – 17.00 Uhr

 

Dr. Julian K.A. Langowski, Experimental Zoology Group, Wageningen University, The Netherlands

 

Kermit’s sticky little fingers: Learning from tree frogs for soft robotic grip


Tree frogs are versatile climbers that use their adhesive toe pads to stick to various substrates, even under challenging conditions. Their remarkable attachment performance renders these animals a promising model for the design of functional surfaces for soft robotic grippers. In this talk, I will present recent research beyond the surface of tree frog toe pads, and discuss the functional relevance and biomimetic potential of previously undescribed pad components. Using synchrotron-micro-computer-tomography, we identified a fibre network that connects the adhesive pad surface with the toe skeleton. Finite-element-analysis suggests that such fibre-reinforcement strengthens the toe pad against mechanical loads during rapid locomotory manoeuvres such as jumping. Furthermore, tree frog toe pads contain smooth muscle fibre bundles, which to our knowledge is unique among bioadhesive systems. These muscular structures may provide tree frogs with pad-intrinsic control mechanisms to regulate attachment. A comparative analysis of the digital mucus gland morphology and mucus chemistry does not support a specialisation towards attachment. In conclusion, tree frogs are a rich source of inspiration for the biomimetic design of versatile and strong adhesive grippers with tuneable attachment strength in soft robotics and beyond.

 

18.05.2021 – 17.00 Uhr

 

Dr. Francesco Picella, Laboratoire d’Hydrodynamique, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, France

 

Controlling laminar-to-turbulent transition with superhydrophobic surfaces

 

Tailoring bio-mimetic rough surfaces researchers are accessing new approaches reducing drag in wall bounded shear flows. Among them Underwater SuperHydrophobic Surfaces (U-SHS) have proven to be capable of dramatically reduce skin friction of an overlying liquid turbulent flow, providing a stable, lubricating layer of gas bubbles trapped within the surface’s nano-sculptures. As long as a specific set of geometrical and thermodynamical conditions are ensured, wetting transition is avoided and the no-slip boundary condition at the wall is relaxed; this so called ’Lotus effect’ is typically achieved when the length scale of U-SHS roughnesses is several order of magnitudes smaller than the overlying flow, bringing out both experimental and numerical challenges. In this framework we want to study, by means of numerical simulations, the influence of U-SHS in a closed channel, following the complete evolution from laminar, to transitional and fully developed turbulent flow. We report the results of transition over U-SHS taking into account the dynamics of each microscopic liquid-gas free-surface by means of a fully coupled fluid-structure solver and show that U-SHS can triple transition time to turbulence. This work has been supported by the French Research Agency (ANR- 15-CE29-0008)

 

08.06.2021 - 17.00 Uhr

 

Dr. Thomas Engels, Institute of Biosciences, Rostock University

 

There is a Fly in my Supercomputer: What Numerical Simulations Teach us About the Flight of Houseflies.

 

Flapping insect flight is a highly active topic within the interdisciplinary community of biomechanics and biomimetics. In our work, we combine the perspectives of experimental biology and numerical modeling, and study the aerodynamics of the housefly, Musca domestica, using massively parallel supercomputers. In the talk, I will give an overview on the state of the art of numerical simulations of insects, and how this work connects to biology as well as engineering. The secret to a fly's flight lies in its wings, and I will discuss in depth how different features of the wing, namely corrugation and chamber, affect its aerodynamic performance. We extend this work to include flexible wings, interacting with surrounding air, and also discuss how insects interact with their turbulent environment.

 

15.06.2021 - 17.00 Uhr

 

Prof. Dr. Antoine Le Duigou, Dupuy de Lôme Research Institute, France

 

Biomimicry and 4D printing for 4.0 biocomposites

Natural fibre composites suffer from humidity, this is not new and most of researcher try to find issue about that especially by modifying fibre chemistry. Application of Biomimicry paradigm open the way a novel functionnality by taking benefit of humidity sensivity of natural fibre : hygromorphing. Inpired by pine cone scale architecture/function relationship, hygromorph biocomposites are a novel class of shape-changing materials. Complex architecture is often the key of biological structures. 4D printing is thus developped to propose and imagine hygromoph biocomposite with predetermined response for various applications (building, marine...).


Portraitbild Prof. Dr. Baars
Prof. Dr. Albert Baars, Organisator
Logo B-I-C
 

 

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